Freedom's Sword, William Wallace, ink drawing

A depiction of William Wallace’s sword planted in the ground at the location of his greatest victory at Stirling Bridge. This is a depiction of the famous Wallace Sword, an antique Claymore, kept in the Wallace monument at Stirling which is said to have belonged to Wallace himself and is claimed to have been used by him at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297 and the Battle of Falkirk in 1298.
The shaft of the sword measures 4 feet 4 inches in length and 5 feet 4 inches including the hilt. The breadth of the blade varies from 2.25 inches at the guard to 0.75 inches before the point. The sword weighs 6.0 pounds (2.7 kg). Although it is now an iconic sword, there is great dubiety as to the authenticity of the blade which has been refurbished at several stages of its existence. There are parts of it which do date back to the 13th century, however.
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Freedom's Sword, William Wallace, ink drawing

Freedom's Sword, William Wallace, ink drawing

A depiction of William Wallace’s sword planted in the ground at the location of his greatest victory at Stirling Bridge. This is a depiction of the famous Wallace Sword, an antique Claymore, kept in the Wallace monument at Stirling which is said to have belonged to Wallace himself and is claimed to have been used by him at the Battle of Stirling Bridge in 1297 and the Battle of Falkirk in 1298.
The shaft of the sword measures 4 feet 4 inches in length and 5 feet 4 inches including the hilt. The breadth of the blade varies from 2.25 inches at the guard to 0.75 inches before the point. The sword weighs 6.0 pounds (2.7 kg). Although it is now an iconic sword, there is great dubiety as to the authenticity of the blade which has been refurbished at several stages of its existence. There are parts of it which do date back to the 13th century, however.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: