Selby incident

December 1291 – after recently hearing of the death of his father at the hands of an English knight, a disconsolate William Wallace was accosted in the streets of Dundee by young Selby, the arrogant son of the local English Constable, a cruel and despicable man. Young Selby had a particular fondness for humiliating Scots in the street and he could not resist the towering giant who appeared before him. Buoyed by the encouragement of several of his armed colleagues, he taunted Wallace about the death of his father to provoke a reaction. Having failed, Selby then tried to grab Wallace's dirk. Wallace's response was swift and lethal. He drew his dirk and plunged it into Selby's heart, killing him instantly. Selby’s colleagues attempted to draw their swords but were prevented from doing so by the crowd who had gathered. Wallace made good his escape but was pursued. Finally, he evaded his pursuers by ducking into his old nursemaid’s house, throwing a shawl over his shoulders and putting on a woman’s cap. He sat nervously weaving at a loom as the pursuit crashed through the house and out the back door.
The ruse had worked, but it was announced that afternoon that there was a warrant out for the murderer of Selby's son. The Constable of Dundee was irate. He proclaimed that if the murderer was not handed over to the authorities then the whole town would be burnt to the ground and everyone within it.
Everyone knew who the killer was, no one else could fit the description of the man the English were after so William and his mother immediately left for Dunfermline then on to Elderslie where they learned that news of Selby's son's death was quickly spreading. Sir Alan Fitz-Alan, the Governor of Dundee, had labelled Wallace an outlaw and a price had now been placed upon his head. William now took to the heather and the legend of his resistance to the English occupation was born.
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Selby incident

Selby incident

December 1291 – after recently hearing of the death of his father at the hands of an English knight, a disconsolate William Wallace was accosted in the streets of Dundee by young Selby, the arrogant son of the local English Constable, a cruel and despicable man. Young Selby had a particular fondness for humiliating Scots in the street and he could not resist the towering giant who appeared before him. Buoyed by the encouragement of several of his armed colleagues, he taunted Wallace about the death of his father to provoke a reaction. Having failed, Selby then tried to grab Wallace's dirk. Wallace's response was swift and lethal. He drew his dirk and plunged it into Selby's heart, killing him instantly. Selby’s colleagues attempted to draw their swords but were prevented from doing so by the crowd who had gathered. Wallace made good his escape but was pursued. Finally, he evaded his pursuers by ducking into his old nursemaid’s house, throwing a shawl over his shoulders and putting on a woman’s cap. He sat nervously weaving at a loom as the pursuit crashed through the house and out the back door.
The ruse had worked, but it was announced that afternoon that there was a warrant out for the murderer of Selby's son. The Constable of Dundee was irate. He proclaimed that if the murderer was not handed over to the authorities then the whole town would be burnt to the ground and everyone within it.
Everyone knew who the killer was, no one else could fit the description of the man the English were after so William and his mother immediately left for Dunfermline then on to Elderslie where they learned that news of Selby's son's death was quickly spreading. Sir Alan Fitz-Alan, the Governor of Dundee, had labelled Wallace an outlaw and a price had now been placed upon his head. William now took to the heather and the legend of his resistance to the English occupation was born.
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Date:
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